Gone Girl (2014)

“You two are the most f****d up people I’ve ever met, and I deal with f****d up people for a living.”

David Fincher has added one of the darkest strings to his bow with his newest film Gone Girl.  A delightfully decadent and addictive blend of mystery thriller and dark comedy, the film oozes Fincher’s style in a way not seen since Zodiac and Seven. Fans of his earlier work will be pleased with Gone Girl’s gripping story and the almost endless and ultimately  unnerving character depth.

Beginning with the disappearance of beautiful young woman Amy Dunn, the film moves between the present interrogation of Affleck and his suspicious indifference, and the past, which is drawn from accounts from Amy’s diary and personal narrative. The viewer is drawn cleverly into a subjective account of events, never really sure what, if anything, Affleck is hiding. As the media creates its own conclusions about the disappearance of “Amazing” Amy, the viewer is torn between the truth, and the media’s agenda.

As with all great films, Gone Girl focusses on its characters, as Fincher manipulates our assumptions and fears to ensure the story twists and hides at just the right time. There is always a hidden threat lying beneath the skin of both main characters, as we realise that like everyone else, their identity is formed as much through their own personality, as by everyone’s elses perceptions.

Fincher creates such an infectious sense of realism that permeates all the characters, including a eerily quiet Neil Patrick Harris as the ex-boyfriend. Although Affleck nails the necessary balance between victim and suspect, it is Rosamund Pike, especially in the latter parts of the film whom steals the show. It just wouldn’t be the same without her, and her performance will likely have you feeling several emotions at the same time when the credits roll. What those emotions are will be in the hands of the viewer, as Fincher’s manipulation of us is quite inescapable as the mystery unravels.

Shapstik Verdict: Mysterious, funny and chilling, Gone Girl is easily one of the best films of the year. Not since Zodiac has Fincher delivered such a dark film, and not since Seven has one felt quite so interrogative of the human condition. Strangely addictive whilst sometimes uncomfortable to hear and see, Fincher delivers an astute lesson in character depth and one that I cannot recommend enough. 9/10

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